Dartmouth Events

Counter-Communities, Uncivil Resistance and Queer Epistemic Activism

A public lecture by José Medina, Northwestern University. Part of the Race, Gender, and Justice lecture series presented by the Philosophy Department.

Monday, May 6, 2024
4:00pm – 5:30pm
Filene Auditorium, Moore Building
Intended Audience(s): Public
Categories: Arts and Sciences, Lectures & Seminars

Monday, May 6

José Medina, Northwestern University
Talk title: Counter-Communities, Uncivil Resistance and Queer Epistemic Activism
Talk description: "This talk will argue that the fight against stigmatizing forms of social exclusion requires uncivil resistance and participation in a community whose counter-practices prefigure a new sensibility and the abolition of unjust social arrangements. I argue that, when confronting stigmatizing taboos, protests must be uncivil in order to confront (and transform) sensibilities through epistemic and affective friction. I argue that a central part of the task of uncivil resistance is what I call epistemic activism, which consists in subversive practices that resist stigmatizing silences and deploy epistemic and affective friction against dominant sensibilities. The talk will focus on multiracial queer activism and the social silences that differently racialized queer activists fight. Examples will include the Cooper Do-nuts Riot of 1959 in L.A., the Stonewall Riots of 1969 in New York City, and the visibility actions of Queer Nation in the 1990’s."

4:00-5:30pm
Filene Auditorium (tentative)
Free & Open to All

Part of the Philosophy Department's Race, Gender, and Justice lecture series. For more information, please visit: https://philosophy.dartmouth.edu/menufeature/news-events/lecture-series/race-gender-and-justice-lecture-series

Funded by the Mark J. Byrne 1985 Fund in Philosophy, which is an endowment established in 1996 to help support the study of philosophy at Dartmouth College; generously cosponsored by the Ethics Institute and the Leslie Center for the Humanities.

For more information, contact:
Prof Susan Brison

Events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted.